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engineer-electrical:electronics [2020/05/07 10:45]
jjensen [Ohm's Law and Power]
engineer-electrical:electronics [2020/05/07 11:03]
jjensen [Voltage]
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   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.png|Electrical Voltage}}   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.png|Electrical Voltage}}
   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.gif|Electrical Voltage Animation}}   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.gif|Electrical Voltage Animation}}
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage-examples.png|Voltage Examples}}
 ===== Resistance ===== ===== Resistance =====
   * Resistance is the opposition to electron flow   * Resistance is the opposition to electron flow
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     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:georg-simon-ohm.jpg|Fig. 1-2 Georg Simon Ohm}}     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:georg-simon-ohm.jpg|Fig. 1-2 Georg Simon Ohm}}
  
 +==== Resistor Examples ====
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistor-examples.png|Resistor Examples}}
 ==== Conductance ==== ==== Conductance ====
   * Conductance, G is the inverse of resistance   * Conductance, G is the inverse of resistance
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   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:inductance.png|Inductance}}   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:inductance.png|Inductance}}
  
 +=== Inductor Examples ===
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:inductor-examples.png|Inductor Examples}}
 ===== Capacitance ===== ===== Capacitance =====
   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:capacitance.png|Capacitance}}   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:capacitance.png|Capacitance}}
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     * In your home circuit, the voltage remains constant, usually 115 volts. Amperage draw will vary with the number of lights and appliances connected into each circuit. Stoves, hot-water heaters and air conditioners are usually on a separate, 220-volt circuit.     * In your home circuit, the voltage remains constant, usually 115 volts. Amperage draw will vary with the number of lights and appliances connected into each circuit. Stoves, hot-water heaters and air conditioners are usually on a separate, 220-volt circuit.
     * To figure the current load a standard circuit can safely carry, determine its wattage capacity by multiplying the voltage (115 volts) by the size of the fuse (usually 15 amps). Total the wattage of each item already in the circuit and subtract this from the wattage capacity. The remainder will tell you how much you can add safely. (Popular Mechanics Do-It-Yourself Encyclopedia, Vol 1, p. 109)     * To figure the current load a standard circuit can safely carry, determine its wattage capacity by multiplying the voltage (115 volts) by the size of the fuse (usually 15 amps). Total the wattage of each item already in the circuit and subtract this from the wattage capacity. The remainder will tell you how much you can add safely. (Popular Mechanics Do-It-Yourself Encyclopedia, Vol 1, p. 109)
 +
 +=== Power ===
 +  * Power, P is the rate of doing work
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:power-schematic.png|Power Schematic}}
    
 ===== Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) ===== ===== Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) =====
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