Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
Last revision Both sides next revision
engineer-electrical:electronics [2020/05/06 19:30]
jjensen [Resistance]
engineer-electrical:electronics [2020/05/07 11:03]
jjensen [Voltage]
Line 27: Line 27:
   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.png|Electrical Voltage}}   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.png|Electrical Voltage}}
   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.gif|Electrical Voltage Animation}}   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage.gif|Electrical Voltage Animation}}
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:voltage-examples.png|Voltage Examples}}
 ===== Resistance ===== ===== Resistance =====
   * Resistance is the opposition to electron flow   * Resistance is the opposition to electron flow
     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistance.png|Resistance}}     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistance.png|Resistance}}
 +    * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistance-calc.png|Resistance Calculation}}
     * Resistance of a wire     * Resistance of a wire
       * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistance-wire.png|Resistance of Wire}}       * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistance-wire.png|Resistance of Wire}}
   * **Resistance** is an opposition to current and is caused by a lack of available charge carriers or a difficulty in moving charge carriers through a material. The unit of resistance is the **ohm**, which is name in honor of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Ohm|Georg Simon Ohm]] (1787-1854), a Bavarian-born German physicist. The Greek capital letter omega (O) is often used as an abbreviation for the work ohm. In mathematical equations, the ohm is represented by the capital letter **R** (Electricity and Electronics by Newman, p. 62)   * **Resistance** is an opposition to current and is caused by a lack of available charge carriers or a difficulty in moving charge carriers through a material. The unit of resistance is the **ohm**, which is name in honor of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Ohm|Georg Simon Ohm]] (1787-1854), a Bavarian-born German physicist. The Greek capital letter omega (O) is often used as an abbreviation for the work ohm. In mathematical equations, the ohm is represented by the capital letter **R** (Electricity and Electronics by Newman, p. 62)
     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:georg-simon-ohm.jpg|Fig. 1-2 Georg Simon Ohm}}     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:georg-simon-ohm.jpg|Fig. 1-2 Georg Simon Ohm}}
 +
 +==== Resistor Examples ====
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistor-examples.png|Resistor Examples}}
 +==== Conductance ====
 +  * Conductance, G is the inverse of resistance
 +    * G = 1/R, units of Siemens
 +    * gold, copper and silver are good conductors of electrons
  
 ==== Resistors ==== ==== Resistors ====
Line 44: Line 53:
     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistorsohms.png|Fig. 1-1 Resistor Color Code and Abbreviations}}     * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:resistorsohms.png|Fig. 1-1 Resistor Color Code and Abbreviations}}
  
 +===== Inductance =====
 +  * Inductance, L in an electric circuit creates opposition to changes in current. Introduce delay in a circuit, choke coils, creates a slower rise in current and voltage.
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:inductance.png|Inductance}}
 +
 +=== Inductor Examples ===
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:inductor-examples.png|Inductor Examples}}
 +===== Capacitance =====
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:capacitance.png|Capacitance}}
 ===== Transistor ===== ===== Transistor =====
   * "A three-terminal semiconductor device that can amplify an ac signal or be used as an electronic switch" (Grob's Basic Electronics, 11th Edition by Mitchel E. Schultz, p. 1167)   * "A three-terminal semiconductor device that can amplify an ac signal or be used as an electronic switch" (Grob's Basic Electronics, 11th Edition by Mitchel E. Schultz, p. 1167)
Line 53: Line 70:
   * Volts = Amps x Ohms   * Volts = Amps x Ohms
   * V = IR   * V = IR
 +    * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:ohmslaw.png|Ohm's Law Triangle}}
     * <HTML><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FIlFcoPAwdM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></HTML>     * <HTML><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FIlFcoPAwdM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></HTML>
   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:ohms-law.png|Fig. 1-1 Ohm's Law and Power Equations}}   * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:ohms-law.png|Fig. 1-1 Ohm's Law and Power Equations}}
Line 60: Line 78:
     * In your home circuit, the voltage remains constant, usually 115 volts. Amperage draw will vary with the number of lights and appliances connected into each circuit. Stoves, hot-water heaters and air conditioners are usually on a separate, 220-volt circuit.     * In your home circuit, the voltage remains constant, usually 115 volts. Amperage draw will vary with the number of lights and appliances connected into each circuit. Stoves, hot-water heaters and air conditioners are usually on a separate, 220-volt circuit.
     * To figure the current load a standard circuit can safely carry, determine its wattage capacity by multiplying the voltage (115 volts) by the size of the fuse (usually 15 amps). Total the wattage of each item already in the circuit and subtract this from the wattage capacity. The remainder will tell you how much you can add safely. (Popular Mechanics Do-It-Yourself Encyclopedia, Vol 1, p. 109)     * To figure the current load a standard circuit can safely carry, determine its wattage capacity by multiplying the voltage (115 volts) by the size of the fuse (usually 15 amps). Total the wattage of each item already in the circuit and subtract this from the wattage capacity. The remainder will tell you how much you can add safely. (Popular Mechanics Do-It-Yourself Encyclopedia, Vol 1, p. 109)
 +
 +=== Power ===
 +  * Power, P is the rate of doing work
 +  * {{engineer-electrical:electronics:power-schematic.png|Power Schematic}}
    
 ===== Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) ===== ===== Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) =====
Navigation

Civil Engineering Engineering - Computer Engineering - Electrical Mechanical Engineering

Print/export
QR Code
QR Code engineer-electrical:electronics (generated for current page)